World History

 

(1)  History. The student understands traditional historical points of reference in world history. The student is expected to:

(A) identify major causes and describe the major effects of the following events from 8000 BC to 500 BC: the development of agriculture and the development of the river valley civilizations; 
(B) identify major causes and describe the major effects of the following events from 500 BC to AD 600: the development of the classical civilizations of Greece, Rome, Persia, India (Maurya and Gupta), China (Zhou, Qin, and Han), and the development of major world religions;

(C) identify major causes and describe the major effects of the following important turning points in world history from 600 to 1450: the spread of Christianity, the decline of Rome and the formation of medieval Europe; the development of Islamic caliphates and their impact on Asia, Africa, and Europe; the Mongol invasions and their impact on Europe, China, India, and Southwest Asia;

(D) identify major causes and describe the major effects of the following important turning points in world history from 1450 to 1750: the rise of the Ottoman Empire, the influence of the Ming dynasty on world trade, European exploration and the Columbian Exchange, European expansion, and the Renaissance and the Reformation;

(E) identify major causes and describe the major effects of the following important turning points in world history from 1750 to 1914: the Scientific Revolution, the Industrial Revolution and its impact on the development of modern economic systems, European imperialism, and the Enlightenment's impact on political revolutions; and

(F) identify major causes and describe the major effects of the following important turning points in world history from 1914 to the present: the world wars and their impact on political, economic, and social systems; communist revolutions and their impact on the Cold War; independence movements; and globalization.

Interactive Student
(A) 
Viking Quest
(A, D) Battle of Hastings

(C) Kings and Queens Timeline
(C) Age of Exploration

Interactive Classroom
(C) American Jewish Timeline

(2) History. The student understands how early civilizations developed from 8000 BC to 500 BC. The student is expected to: (A) summarize the impact of the development of farming (Neolithic Revolution) on the creation of river valley civilizations;

(B) identify the characteristics of civilization; and

(C) explain how major river valley civilizations influenced the development of the classical civilizations.

Interactive Student

Interactive Classroom

(3) History. The student understands the contributions and influence of classical civilizations from 500 BC to AD 600 on subsequent civilizations. The student is expected to: (A) describe the major political, religious/philosophical, and cultural influences of Persia, India, China, Israel, Greece, and Rome, including the development of monotheism, Judaism, and Christianity;

(B) explain the impact of the fall of Rome on Western Europe; and

(C) compare the factors that led to the collapse of Rome and Han China.

Interactive Student
(A) Virtual Medieval Paris

Interactive Classroom

(4) History. The student understands how, after the collapse of classical empires, new political, economic, and social systems evolved and expanded from 600 to 1450. The student is expected to: (A) explain the development of Christianity as a unifying social and political factor in medieval Europe and the Byzantine Empire;

(B) explain the characteristics of Roman Catholicism and Eastern Orthodoxy;

(C) describe the major characteristics of and the factors contributing to the development of the political/social system of feudalism and the economic system of manorialism;

(D) explain the political, economic, and social impact of Islam on Europe, Asia, and Africa;

(E) describe the interactions among Muslim, Christian, and Jewish societies in Europe, Asia, and North Africa;

(F) describe the interactions between Muslim and Hindu societies in South Asia;

(G) explain how the Crusades, the Black Death, the Hundred Years' War, and the Great Schism contributed to the end of medieval Europe;

(H) summarize the major political, economic, and cultural developments in Tang and Song China and their impact on Eastern Asia;

(I) explain the development of the slave trade;

(J) analyze how the Silk Road and the African gold-salt trade facilitated the spread of ideas and trade; and

(K) summarize the changes resulting from the Mongol invasions of Russia, China, and the Islamic world.

Interactive Student 
(A, B) The Renaissance Connection
(A) European Renaissance and Reformation - Crossword Puzzle 
(A) European Renaissance and Reformation - Quiz

Interactive Classroom 
(A) (B) European Renaissance and Reformation - Assessment Internet Activity

(A, B) The Renaissance Connection

(5) History. The student understands the causes, characteristics, and impact of the European Renaissance and the Reformation from 1450 to 1750. The student is expected to: (A) explain the political, intellectual, artistic, economic, and religious impact of the Renaissance; and

(B) explain the political, intellectual, artistic, economic, and religious impact of the Reformation.

Interactive Student 
(A) An Age of Exploration and Isolation - Crossword Puzzle 
(A) An Age of Exploration and Isolation - Quiz

Interactive Classroom 
(A) (B) An Age of Exploration and Isolation - Assessment Internet Activity

(6) History. The student understands the characteristics and impact of the Maya, Inca, and Aztec civilizations. The student is expected to: (A) compare the major political, economic, social, and cultural developments of the Maya, Inca, and Aztec civilizations and explain how prior civilizations influenced their development; and

(B) explain how the Inca and Aztec empires were impacted by European exploration/colonization.

Interactive Student 
(A) African Civilizations - Crossword Puzzle 
(A) African Civilizations - Quiz

(B) Ancient Americas

Interactive Classroom 
(A) (B) African Civilizations - Assessment Internet Activity

(7) History. The student understands the causes and impact of European expansion from 1450 to 1750. The student is expected to: (A) analyze the causes of European expansion from 1450 to 1750;

(B) explain the impact of the Columbian Exchange on the Americas and Europe;

(C) explain the impact of the Atlantic slave trade on West Africa and the Americas;

(D) explain the impact of the Ottoman Empire on Eastern Europe and global trade;

(E) explain Ming China's impact on global trade; and

(F) explain new economic factors and principles that contributed to the success of Europe's Commercial Revolution.

Interactive Student
(A) 
 Pyramid Builder
(A) 
First Age of Empires - Crossword Puzzle 
(A) First Age of Empires - Quiz 
(A) The Muslim World Expands - Crossword Puzzle 
(A) The Muslim World Expands - Quiz

Interactive Classroom
(A) (B) 
First Age of Empires - Assessment Internet Activity 
(A) (B) The Muslim World Expands - Assessment Internet Activity 
 

(8) History. The student understands the causes and the global impact of the Industrial Revolution and European imperialism from 1750 to 1914. The student is expected to: (A) explain how 17th and 18th century European scientific advancements led to the Industrial Revolution;

(B) explain how the Industrial Revolution led to political, economic, and social changes in Europe;

(C) identify the major political, economic, and social motivations that influenced European imperialism;

(D) explain the major characteristics and impact of European imperialism; and

(E) explain the effects of free enterprise in the Industrial Revolution.

Interactive Student

Interactive Classroom

(9) History. The student understands the causes and effects of major political revolutions between 1750 and 1914. The student is expected to: (A) compare the causes, characteristics, and consequences of the American and French revolutions, emphasizing the role of the Enlightenment, the Glorious Revolution, and religion;

(B) explain the impact of Napoleon Bonaparte and the Napoleonic Wars on Europe and Latin America;

(C) trace the influence of the American and French revolutions on Latin America, including the role of Simón Bolivar; and

(D) identify the influence of ideas such as separation of powers, checks and balances, liberty, equality, democracy, popular sovereignty, human rights, constitutionalism, and nationalism on political revolutions.

Interactive Student
(A, B) Genocide Under the Nazis

Interactive Classroom

(10) History. The student understands the causes and impact of World War I. The student is expected to: (A) identify the importance of imperialism, nationalism, militarism, and the alliance system in causing World War I;

(B) identify major characteristics of World War I, including total war, trench warfare, modern military technology, and high casualty rates;

(C) explain the political impact of Woodrow Wilson's Fourteen Points and the political and economic impact of the Treaty of Versailles, including changes in boundaries and the mandate system; and

(D) identify the causes of the February (March) and October revolutions of 1917 in Russia, their effects on the outcome of World War I, and the Bolshevik establishment of the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics.

Interactive Student

(A) Rise of Hitler

Interactive Classroom
 

(11) History. The student understands the causes and impact of the global economic depression immediately following World War I. The student is expected to: (A) summarize the international, political, and economic causes of the global depression; and

(B) explain the responses of governments in the United States, Germany, and the Soviet Union to the global depression.

Interactive Student

Interactive Classroom

(12) History. The student understands the causes and impact of World War II. The student is expected to: (A) describe the emergence and characteristics of totalitarianism;

(B) explain the roles of various world leaders, including Benito Mussolini, Adolf Hitler, Hideki Tojo, Joseph Stalin, Franklin D. Roosevelt, and Winston Churchill, prior to and during World War II; and

(C) explain the major causes and events of World War II, including the German invasions of Poland and the Soviet Union, the Holocaust, Japanese imperialism, the attack on Pearl Harbor, the Normandy landings, and the dropping of the atomic bombs.

Interactive Student
(A) 
Early River Valley Civilizations - Crossword Puzzle 
(A) Early River Valley Civilizations - Quiz

Interactive Classroom
(A) (B) 
Early River Valley Civilizations - Assessment Internet Activity

(13) History. The student understands the impact of major events associated with the Cold War and independence movements. The student is expected to: (A) summarize how the outcome of World War II contributed to the development of the Cold War;

(B) summarize the factors that contributed to communism in China, including Mao Zedong's role in its rise, and how it differed from Soviet communism;

(C) identify the following major events of the Cold War, including the Korean War, the Vietnam War, and the arms race;

(D) explain the roles of modern world leaders, including Ronald Reagan, Mikhail Gorbachev, Lech Walesa, and Pope John Paul II, in the collapse of communism in Eastern Europe and the Soviet Union;

(E) summarize the rise of independence movements in Africa, the Middle East, and South Asia and reasons for ongoing conflicts; and

(F) explain how Arab rejection of the State of Israel has led to ongoing conflict.

Interactive Student 
(A) Peopling of the World - Crossword Puzzle 
(A) Peopling of the World - Quiz

Interactive Classroom 
(A) Peopling of the World - Assessment Internet Activity 
 

(14) History. The student understands the development of radical Islamic fundamentalism and the subsequent use of terrorism by some of its adherents. The student is expected to:

(A) summarize the development and impact of radical Islamic fundamentalism on events in the second half of the 20th century, including Palestinian terrorism and the growth of al Qaeda; and

(B) explain the U.S. response to terrorism from September 11, 2001, to the present.

Interactive Student

Interactive Classroom

(15) Geography. The student uses geographic skills and tools to collect, analyze, and interpret data. The student is expected to: (A) create and interpret thematic maps, graphs, and charts to demonstrate the relationship between geography and the historical development of a region or nation; and

(B) analyze and compare geographic distributions and patterns in world history shown on maps, graphs, charts, and models.

Interactive Student

Interactive Classroom

(16) Geography. The student understands the impact of geographic factors on major historic events and processes. The student is expected to: (A) locate places and regions of historical significance directly related to major eras and turning points in world history;

(B) analyze the influence of human and physical geographic factors on major events in world history, including the development of river valley civilizations, trade in the Indian Ocean, and the opening of the Panama and Suez canals; and

(C) interpret maps, charts, and graphs to explain how geography has influenced people and events in the past.

Interactive Student
(A) 
Classical Greece - Crossword Puzzle
(A) Classical Greece - Quiz

(A) University High World History

Interactive Classroom 
(A) Classical Greece - Assessment Internet Activity 
 

(17) Economics. The student understands the impact of the Neolithic and Industrial revolutions and globalization on humanity. The student is expected to: (A) identify important changes in human life caused by the Neolithic Revolution and the Industrial Revolution;

(B) summarize the role of economics in driving political changes as related to the Neolithic Revolution and the Industrial Revolution; and

(C) summarize the economic and social impact of 20th century globalization.

Interactive Student

Interactive Classroom

(18) Economics. The student understands the historical origins of contemporary economic systems and the benefits of free enterprise in world history. The student is expected to: (A) identify the historical origins and characteristics of the free enterprise system, including the contributions of Adam Smith, especially the influence of his ideas found in The Wealth of Nations;

(B) identify the historical origins and characteristics of communism, including the influences of Karl Marx;

(C) identify the historical origins and characteristics of socialism;

(D) identify the historical origins and characteristics of fascism;

(E) explain why communist command economies collapsed in competition with free market economies at the end of the 20th century; and

(F) formulate generalizations on how economic freedom improved the human condition, based on students' knowledge of the benefits of free enterprise in Europe's Commercial Revolution, the Industrial Revolution, and 20th-century free market economies, compared to communist command communities.

Interactive Student

Interactive Classroom

(19) Government. The student understands the characteristics of major political systems throughout history. The student is expected to: (A) identify the characteristics of monarchies and theocracies as forms of government in early civilizations; and

(B) identify the characteristics of the following political systems: theocracy, absolute monarchy, democracy, republic, oligarchy, limited monarchy, and totalitarianism.

Interactive Student
(B) 
Mummy Maker
(B) Make a Mummy
(A) (B) 
People and Ideas on the Move - Crossword Puzzle 
(A) (B) People and Ideas on the Move - Quiz 
(A) (B)  The Muslim World - Crossword Puzzle 
(A) (B) The Muslim World - Quiz 
(A) (B) World Religions - Crossword Puzzle 
(A) (B) World Religions - Quiz

Interactive Classroom
(B) History of Religion Map
(A) (B) 
People and Ideas on the Move - Assessment Internet Activity 
(A) (B) The Muslim World - Assessment Internet Activity

(20) Government. The student understands how contemporary political systems have developed from earlier systems of government. The student is expected to: (A) explain the development of democratic-republican government from its beginnings in the Judeo-Christian legal tradition and classical Greece and Rome through the English Civil War and the Enlightenment;

(B) identify the impact of political and legal ideas contained in the following documents: Hammurabi's Code, the Jewish Ten Commandments, Justinian's Code of Laws, Magna Carta, the English Bill of Rights, the Declaration of Independence, the U.S. Constitution, and the Declaration of the Rights of Man and of the Citizen;

(C) explain the political philosophies of individuals such as John Locke, Thomas Hobbes, Voltaire, Charles de Montesquieu, Jean Jacques Rousseau, Thomas Aquinas, John Calvin, Thomas Jefferson, and William Blackstone; and

(D) explain the significance of the League of Nations and the United Nations.

Interactive Student
(A) Walk Thru Time
(C) Senet - Egyptian Board Game

Interactive Classroom
(A) 
Iron Age House

(21) Citizenship. The student understands the significance of political choices and decisions made by individuals, groups, and nations throughout history. The student is expected to: (A) describe how people have participated in supporting or changing their governments;

(B) describe the rights and responsibilities of citizens and noncitizens in civic participation throughout history; and

(C) identify examples of key persons who were successful in shifting political thought, including William Wilberforce.

Interactive Student
(A, B) 
Womens' Rights

Interactive Classroom

(22) Citizenship. The student understands the historical development of significant legal and political concepts related to the rights and responsibilities of citizenship. The student is expected to: (A) summarize the development of the rule of law from ancient to modern times;

(B) identify the influence of ideas regarding the right to a "trial by a jury of your peers" and the concepts of "innocent until proven guilty" and "equality before the law" that originated from the Judeo-Christian legal tradition and in Greece and Rome;

(C) identify examples of politically motivated mass murders in Cambodia, China, Latin America, the Soviet Union, and Armenia;

(D) identify examples of genocide, including the Holocaust and genocide in the Balkans, Rwanda, and Darfur;

(E) identify examples of individuals who led resistance to political oppression such as Nelson Mandela, Mohandas Gandhi, Oscar Romero, Natan Sharansky, Las Madres de la Plaza de Mayo, and Chinese student protestors in Tiananmen Square; and

(F) assess the degree to which American ideals have advanced human rights and democratic ideas throughout the world.

Interactive Student 
(A) Ancient Rome and Early Christianity - Crossword Puzzle 
(A) Ancient Rome and Early Christianity - Quiz 
(A) India and China Establish Empires - Crossword Puzzle 
(A) India and China Establish Empires - Quiz

(B) Odyssey Online: Greece

Interactive Classroom 
(A) (B) Ancient Rome and Early Christianity - Assessment Internet Activity 
(A) (B) India and China Establish Empires - Assessment Internet Activity

(23) Culture. The student understands the history and relevance of major religious and philosophical traditions. The student is expected to: (A) describe the historical origins, central ideas, and spread of major religious and philosophical traditions, including Buddhism, Christianity, Confucianism, Hinduism, Islam, Judaism, Sikhism, and the development of monotheism; and

(B) identify examples of religious influence on various events referenced in the major eras of world history.

Interactive Student 
(A) The Americas: A Separate World - Crossword Puzzle 
(A) The Americas: A Separate World - Quiz

Interactive Classroom

(24) Culture. The student understands the roles of women, children, and families in different historical cultures. The student is expected to: (A) describe the changing roles of women, children, and families during major eras of world history; and

(B) describe the major influences of women such as Elizabeth I, Queen Victoria, Mother Teresa, Indira Gandhi, Margaret Thatcher, and Golda Meir during major eras of world history.

Interactive Student
(B) Cotton Millionaire

Interactive Classroom

(25) Culture. The student understands how the development of ideas has influenced institutions and societies. The student is expected to: (A) summarize the fundamental ideas and institutions of Eastern civilizations that originated in China and India;

(B) summarize the fundamental ideas and institutions of Western civilizations that originated in Greece and Rome;

(C) explain the relationship among Christianity, individualism, and growing secularism that began with the Renaissance and how the relationship influenced subsequent political developments; and

(D) explain how Islam influences law and government in the Muslim world.

Interactive Student
(E) Death in Rome

Interactive Classroom

(26) Culture. The student understands the relationship between the arts and the times during which they were created. The student is expected to: (A) identify significant examples of art and architecture that demonstrate an artistic ideal or visual principle from selected cultures;

(B) analyze examples of how art, architecture, literature, music, and drama reflect the history of the cultures in which they are produced; and

(C) identify examples of art, music, and literature that transcend the cultures in which they were created and convey universal themes.

Interactive Student

Interactive Classroom

(27) Science, technology, and society. The student understands how major scientific and mathematical discoveries and technological innovations affected societies prior to 1750. The student is expected to: (A) identify the origin and diffusion of major ideas in mathematics, science, and technology that occurred in river valley civilizations, classical Greece and Rome, classical India, and the Islamic caliphates between 700 and 1200 and in China from the Tang to Ming dynasties;

(B) summarize the major ideas in astronomy, mathematics, and architectural engineering that developed in the Maya, Inca, and Aztec civilizations;

(C) explain the impact of the printing press on the Renaissance and the Reformation in Europe;

(D) describe the origins of the Scientific Revolution in 16th century Europe and explain its impact on scientific thinking worldwide; and

(E) identify the contributions of significant scientists such as Archimedes, Copernicus, Eratosthenes, Galileo, Pythagoras, Isaac Newton, and Robert Boyle.

Interactive Student
(A, B) 
Viking Quest
(A,B) Hunt the Ancestor

Interactive Classroom

(28) Science, technology, and society. The student understands how major scientific and mathematical discoveries and technological innovations have affected societies from 1750 to the present. The student is expected to: (A) explain the role of textile manufacturing and steam technology in initiating the Industrial Revolution and the role of the factory system and transportation technology in advancing the Industrial Revolution; 
(B) explain the roles of military technology, transportation technology, communication technology, and medical advancements in initiating and advancing 19th century imperialism; 
(C) explain the effects of major new military technologies on World War I, World War II, and the Cold War;
(D) explain the role of telecommunication technology, computer technology, transportation technology, and medical advancements in developing the modern global economy and society; and
(E) identify the contributions of significant scientists and inventors such as Marie Curie, Thomas Edison, Albert Einstein, Louis Pasteur, and James Watt.

Interactive Student

Interactive Classroom

(29) Social studies skills. The student applies critical-thinking skills to organize and use information acquired from a variety of valid sources, including electronic technology. The student is expected to (A) identify methods used by archaeologists, anthropologists, historians, and geographers to analyze evidence; 
(B) explain how historians, when examining sources, analyze frame of reference, historical context, and point of view to interpret historical events; 
(C) explain the differences between primary and secondary sources and examine those sources to analyze frame of reference, historical context, and point of view;
(D) evaluate the validity of a source based on language, corroboration with other sources, and information about the author;
(E) identify bias in written, oral, and visual material;
(F) analyze information by sequencing, categorizing, identifying cause-and-effect relationships, comparing, contrasting, finding the main idea, summarizing, making generalizations and predictions, drawing inferences and conclusions, and developing connections between historical events over time;
(G) construct a thesis on a social studies issue or event supported by evidence; and
(H) use appropriate reading and mathematical skills to interpret social studies information such as maps and graphs.

Interactive Student

Interactive Classroom

(30) Social studies skills. The student communicates in written, oral, and visual forms. The student is expected to: (A) use social studies terminology correctly; 
(B) use standard grammar, spelling, sentence structure, and punctuation; 
(C) interpret and create written, oral, and visual presentations of social studies information; and
(D) transfer information from one medium to another.

Interactive Student

Interactive Classroom

(31) Social studies skills. The student uses problem-solving and decision-making skills, working independently and with others, in a variety of settings. The student is expected to: (A) use a problem-solving process to identify a problem, gather information, list and consider options, consider advantages and disadvantages, choose and implement a solution, and evaluate the effectiveness of the solution; and 
(B) use a decision-making process to identify a situation that requires a decision, gather information, identify options, predict consequences, and take action to implement a decision.

Interactive Student

Interactive Classroom